Archives

  • 2018-07
  • 2018-10
  • 2018-11
  • 2019-04
  • 2019-05
  • Predicting the potential effects of

    2019-05-13

    Predicting the potential effects of climate change on the incidence and distribution of infectious gastroenteritis can assist public health providers to control and prevent severe outbreaks in the future. Implementation of programmes for rotavirus vaccination clearly shows benefit and should be an SBI-0206965 cost strategy to help cope with climate change. More importantly, however, Platts-Mills and colleagues identified multiple pathogens contributing to diarrhoeal disease, highlighting the necessity for a broader mitigation plan.
    Lancet Glob Health —In this Correspondence (November, 2015), the first sentence of the fifth paragraph should have read: “From 2009 to 2015, GHC has placed seven fellowship classes totalling 584 fellows (from more than applicants)…” This correction has been made to the online version as of Nov 23, 2015.
    Lancet Glob Health —In this Correspondence (December, 2015), the last sentence should have read: “With this aim, the INMI Lazzaro Spallanzani is starting an international consultation on the critical issues of patients\' discharge outbreak settings.” This correction has been made to the online version as of Nov 23, 2015.
    Lancet Glob Health —In this Article, the title should have been “Effects of a parenting intervention to address maternal psychological wellbeing and child development and growth in rural Uganda: a community-based, cluster-randomised trial”. The primary outcomes were cognitive and receptive language development only, and secondary outcomes were maternal depressive symptoms and child growth. The sixth and seventh sentences of the calcitonin Methods section in the Summary should have read “The primary outcomes were cognitive and receptive language development, as measured with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 3rd edn. Secondary outcomes included self-reported maternal depressive symptoms, using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and child growth.” The last three sentences of the Findings section should have read “At endline, children in the intervention group had significantly higher cognitive scores (58·90 55·65, effect size 0·36, 95% CI 0·12–0·59) and receptive language scores (23·86 22·40, 0·27, 0·03–0·50) than did children in the control group. Mothers in the intervention group reported significantly fewer depressive symptoms (15·36 18·61, −0·391, −0·62 to −0·16) than did mothers in the control group. However, no differences were found in child growth between groups.” In the Outcomes section, the first sentence of the second paragraph should read “Our secondary outcomes were maternal depressive symptoms, as measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and child growth.” In table 2, the effects of intervention should have been listed as primary outcomes and secondary outcomes. These corrections have been made to the online version as of July 16, 2015.